LC Lowers Risk Level to Green

Lee College announced it will lower the health risk level on campus to green beginning Monday, May 24. The announcement came after new guidance was released by the CDC. As a result of a lowered risk level, the College will now be able to provide more in-person classes at full capacity while maintaining an online option as well.

“We couldn’t be more excited to welcome our students and staff back to campus,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College president. “It has been a challenging year, and I am so grateful to our faculty and staff for being resilient and flexible during this time. I’m also proud of our students for their persistence and can-do spirit through it all. We look forward to busy, successful semesters this summer and fall.”

Registration at Lee College is now open for everyone for Summer 2021 and Fall 2021. The College is offering free books for all students this summer and a discount for full-time students of up to $400 on tuition and fees during the Fall 2021 and Spring 2022 terms.

All students and employees are encouraged to protect themselves against Covid-19 by becoming vaccinated if they have not already done so. On June 8, Houston Methodist Hospital will host a vaccine clinic inside the Lee College gym for those who wish to receive their first or second dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

To see a full list of campus updates and guidelines associated with the green risk level, see the Lee College Coronavirus information website. https://www.lee.edu/coronavirus/.


Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

2021 Nursing Grads Celebrate Pinning

Congratulations to the 2021 Lee College Nursing School Graduates: Lorella Ames, Kimberly S. Bell, Latoya L. Blair, Katrina M. Broussard, Darylynn Carter, Maria Fernanda Chavarin, Hershelle Johnette Christian, Stephanie Michelle Davis, Angelica Estrada, Lorena Garza, Danielle Denise Gladney, Katelyn Elizabeth Granelli, Natalie L. Jackson, Yareli J. Juarez, Maleatria A. Kitchen, Sonia Renee Lansford, Samantha Lara Lerma, Natalie Kay Martin, Jazmine Iris Martinez, Joselyn Mendoza, Sarah A. Monaghan, Tara Faith Priddy, Rachael B. Reynolds, Regina Lee Roach, Jacob M. Rogers, Kelsey Ann Caluyo Roque, Joselyn Rosas, Sheri Dawn Taylor, Ifeoluwa Eunice Temi-Ogunyemi, Samantha Kaye Thrush, Guadalupe Velazquez, Lakeshia L. Walker, Jessica Renee Whitehouse, and Guadalupe Zepeda.

After overcoming unprecedented challenges surrounding the pandemic, the Lee College Nursing Class of 2021 celebrated its long-awaited pinning ceremony last Thursday with 34 graduates proudly completing the nursing program.

According to Dr. Janena Norris, dean of nursing and allied health at Lee College, the class of 2021 is an extraordinary class worth celebrating because of their determination, willpower, and drive to succeed.

Nursing graduates in white uniforms standing in an arena next to chairs holding symbolic lamps.
2021 Lee College Nursing School graduates are shown at the traditional pinning ceremony. Faculty members present the nursing pin to new graduate nurses as a symbolic welcome to the profession.

“The class of 2021 has endured an overwhelming amount of challenges. With the restrictions of the pandemic, they had to overcome challenges in getting clinical placements to complete required hours and complete many of their courses online rather than in person. The stress of having nursing school without peers and faculty around them daily created another challenge. Some of them also battled personal hardships and struggles as well,” said Norris.

Most 2021 Lee College nursing school graduates were from the Baytown area with some traveling from as far away as Humble, Texas.   

Norris said many of the 2021 graduates have already received job offers and can enter the workforce with a graduate nurse permit. While they must still take their state board licensing exam and pass to obtain their permanent nursing license, they can begin work with a graduate nurse permit.

Female nursing graduates in white uniforms and masks holding symbolic lamps.
The lamps symbolize knowledge that is passed from instructor to graduate nurse.

“Nursing school is extremely hard even during perfect circumstances, but surviving nursing school amidst a global pandemic is really remarkable,” said Norris. “We are so proud of them and can’t wait to see the big things they accomplish.”

Regina Roach, a Lee College 2021 nursing school graduate said there was a brief period during the height of the pandemic when she wasn’t sure she would make it through the program.

“There was a point when we were homeschooling our three kids, our nursing classes were delayed, none of us had ever taken online classes before, and I came close to quitting,” said Roach. “But my nursing friends and I stuck together and the instructors were so supportive. They still text us and call us to encourage us. The staff is really amazing.”

As a second-career nurse, Roach said she always felt like God made her to serve others, but she never considered nursing until after she delivered her first child in a hospital. From that point on, she felt called to be a nurse.

“I had no idea what nursing school was going to be like going into it,” said Roach. “School was never difficult for me, but nursing school is a whole different world. I studied like it was my fulltime job.”

Four females in white uniforms and masks holding symbolic lamps.
Roach (center right) is shown with her support system and fellow nursing graduates.

Although nursing school is a lot of hard work, Roach said it is extremely rewarding to know that you can accomplish your dreams. She encouraged anyone who is interested in pursuing a career in nursing to go for their dreams and to look into what the nursing program at Lee College has to offer.

“Just go for it,” Roach said to anyone interested in a career in nursing. “Ignore the people who don’t believe in you because you will find your people who believe in you and will help you succeed.”

Roach was hired immediately after graduation and will begin her career as an ICU nurse at HCA Healthcare in the coming weeks.

For more information about how to make your dream of becoming a nurse a reality, visit the Lee College nursing program website at www.lee.edu/nursing.  

Campus Program Focuses on Sexual Assault Awareness

According to RAINN’s website, every 73 seconds a person is sexually assaulted in the United States. However, many of those cases go unreported because of fear or confusion surrounding the incident.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), and the Lee College Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (SaVe) program wants to remind everyone about the on- and off-campus resources available to assist students and employees at any stage in their journey as a survivor or a person who supports survivors of sexual assault.

You are not alone.
CampusSaVE reminds you April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month 
For resources: www.lee.edu/titleix/available-resources/
Lee College

Kassandra Flores, Puente Program Coordinator and Campus SaVE Advisor explains that some individuals may have experienced this type of assault and developed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder as a result. Programs like Campus SaVE and SAAM are designed to help educate faculty, staff and students and give them a means to identify and name some of those experiences.

“I think one of the greatest things about Sexual Assault Awareness Month is that people are actively sharing their stories, statistics, resources, and most importantly, showing support,” said Flores. “Sometimes all the other person needs to hear is ‘I believe you’ and ‘you are not alone.’”

If you or someone you know has experienced any form of sexual violence, to include sexual harassment, stalking, intimate partner violence, or sexual assault, help and resources are available.

The Campus SaVE advisory committee consists of both campus and community representatives. This group meets several times each semester to discuss policy and bringing information to the campus regarding sexual harassment, domestic violence, stalking, dating violence, and sexual assault.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee Offers Student Discounts, Free Books

The Lee College Board of Regents on Monday unanimously approved a student support plan that will provide free books to all students this summer and save full-time students up to $400 on tuition and fees during the Fall 2021 and Spring 2022 terms. The support plan is another way Lee College is striving to help all students continue their educational goals and overcome the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

“Lee College’s student assistance for summer, fall and spring is designed to encourage students not only to finish the journey they started previously at Lee College, but it will hopefully attract many students who were going to enter college last fall but postponed their plans due to the pandemic,” said Dr. Douglas Walcerz, provost and vice president of academic and student affairs at Lee College. “Now that we are closer to the end of the pandemic than the beginning, we look forward to more and more students feeling confident about enrolling and finishing their degree or certificate here at Lee College.”

Although degree seeking and certificate seeking students are required to complete the FAFSA or TAFSA to receive the benefits, this assistance is considered a first-dollar scholarship that is awarded to each student regardless of the amount of financial aid they receive.

Because the program is designed to encourage persistence, students must take advantage of the Fall 2021 assistance to be eligible for the Spring 2022 assistance. Plan details are outlined below:

Summer 2021

1. Dual-credit, and degree- and certificate-seeking students will receive free books via the myBooks program.

2. Degree- and certificate-seeking students must complete the FAFSA/TASFA to qualify for benefits.

3. Benefits are paid by the college, regardless of how much financial aid a student receives.

Fall 2021

1. The fall support plan only applies to degree- and certificate-seeking students (non-dual credit).

2. Students will receive free books via the myBooks program.

3. Students must complete the FAFSA/TAFSA to qualify for these benefits.

4. Benefits are paid by the College regardless of how much financial aid a student receives.

5. Students will receive a discount on tuition and fees of $400 for full-time enrollment, or $200 discount on tuition and fees for half-time enrollment. There is no discount for student enrolled at less than half-time.

6. Students who pass all of their fall courses with a C or better receive the same assistance for free books and the same discount on tuition and fees on their spring courses.

Spring 2022

1. The spring assistance only applies to degree- and certificate-seeking students who received free books and tuition discounts in the fall semester. Students who were not enrolled in the fall are not eligible for free books or a discount on tuition and fees in the spring.

2. Free books and tuition discounts are paid by the College regardless of how much financial aid a student receives.

3. Full-time students will receive a discount on tuition and fees of $400 and half-time students will receive a discount on tuition and fees of $200. Students who pass all of their fall courses with a C or better receive free books and a discount on tuition and fees of $400 for full-time students and $200 for half-time students.

Students who have one enrollment intensity in the fall, e.g., full-time, and a different enrollment intensity in the spring, e.g., part-time, receive the corresponding discount in each semester.

4. Students who will be within 15 semester credit hours of completing an associate degree by the end of the fall semester receive an additional $100 discount if they meet with an academic advisor and sign a completion plan prior to Friday, Oct. 29, 2021.

Lee College advisors will be available to help explain the student support program and answer any questions students or their parents may have about how to qualify for the discounts. Students are also encouraged to visit the 2021 Support Program website for more information: https://www.lee.edu/free/.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Virtual Candidate Forum set for April 22

Baytown, TX – Lee College is proud to host a virtual candidate forum featuring the 2021 candidates for the Lee College Board of Regents. This event will be broadcast on YouTube Live at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 22, 2021. The purpose of this forum is to allow the candidates for Regent to publicly clarify their visions for Lee College’s future. Candidates who have confirmed their attendance for the virtual forum are Mark Hall, Mark Himsel, Weston Cotten, and David Isaac.

“Lee College is at a pivotal time in its history, and this Regent election is very important to the future of our institution,” said Karen Guthmiller, president of the Lee College Faculty Assembly. “The forum gives all candidates the opportunity to be heard and allow voters to make their decision about who they believe will best serve the College.”

View the April 22 YouTube Live event.

Early voting is April 19-27, 2021. Election day is May 1, 2021. Eligible voters in Chambers County can vote at the Chambers County Cedar Bayou Annex, 7711 N. Highway 146. For a full list of Harris County polling locations and to check your eligibility to vote in this election, see http://www.harrisvotes.com.

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Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

LC students get edge with INEOS simulator

Baytown, TX – Lee College analytics technology and measurements students will receive hands-on training and be better prepared to successfully enter the workforce thanks to a generous donation from INEOS Olefins & Polymers USA (“INEOS”).

Four people standing in front of the analyzer shed. Robert Bradshaw, Site Manager, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex; Dr. Lynda Villanueva, President, Lee College; Marsha Tuha, Executive Director, Lee College Center for Workforce & Community Development; Dave Lierman, Maintenance Supervisor, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex.
(Left to right): Robert Bradshaw, Site Manager, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex; Dr. Lynda Villanueva, President, Lee College; Marsha Tuha, Executive Director, Lee College Center for Workforce & Community Development; Dave Lierman, Maintenance Supervisor, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex.

Last December, INEOS donated an analyzer shelter to Lee College for students who are actively learning about analyzer readings and process operations in the chemical plant industry. Lee College is the only college in the Houston area with a training facility of its kind.

“A motivated, well trained technical workforce is incumbent to safe and reliable operations of our facilities,” said Robert (Bob) Bradshaw, Site Manager for the INEOS Battleground Manufacturing Complex in La Porte. “We at INEOS are proud to partner with Lee College to provide quality educational opportunities which lead to gainful employment for the next generation in our community.”

Most modern chemical plants use analyzer shelters to provide a controlled environment to test and control end products. The analyzer shelter is a container-type structure that protects the measurement components from adverse conditions that can affect analyzer readings.

“Lee College is excited to enhance our Analytical program with the donation from INEOS that allows real-world preparation and hands-on exposure to the actual equipment students will encounter while working in the field,” said Marsha Tuha, executive director of Lee College’s Center for Workforce and Community Development. “When hiring Lee College graduates, employers can be confident their employees received thorough, high-quality training because of resources like the analyzer shelter.”

The analyzer shelter at Lee College will accommodate the components necessary to teach analyzer technology in a real-world setting. Several high demand classes will use the analyzer shelter, including:

  • 16-hour Analyzer troubleshooting
  • 40-hour Introduction to Analyzer training
  • Introduction to Sample Systems
  • Chromatography

Lee College’s Advanced Technical Training Center offers fast-track courses and customized programs for nearly every industry. To learn more about the analytics technology and measurements and other high-demand degrees and certificate programs enrolling now, go to www.lee.edu/workforce.


Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

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LC chosen for Racial Equity Leadership Academy

Baytown, TX – Lee College is one of 10 colleges selected to participate in the national Achieving the Dream (ATD) and the University of Southern California (USC) Race and Equity Center Racial Equity Leadership Academy (RELA), a year-long program scheduled to begin in summer 2021. The intensive program is designed to support teams of five individuals from each college in the development of a bold, strategic racial equity plan to implement actionable solutions at their institutions.

“We are excited to be part of the RELA program. Our students are at the heart of everything we do, and participation in this program will allow us to provide the best possible learning experience for our traditionally underserved student populations,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College president.

Other colleges selected for the program included Anne Arundel Community College (MD); Austin Community College District (TX); Broward College (FL); Chattanooga State Community College (TN); Columbus State Community College (OH); Kingsborough Community College (NY); Montgomery County Community College (PA); Mott Community College (MI); and Pierce College (WA).

With programming based on ATD’s Institutional Capacity Framework and tailored to community colleges working to overcome equity-focused challenges, RELA will occur July 26–29, 2021. College teams will work together to develop a strategic racial equity change effort that will launch at each institution during the Fall 2021 semester.

“Our goal is to serve traditionally marginalized student populations and their families by removing systemic barriers and empowering their success,” said Dr. Victoria Marron, Lee College’s Associate Vice President of Retention and Transition Services and Chief Equity Officer. “This program will help equip us to make that goal a reality.”

By the end of RELA, teams from each college will have identified a racial equity change effort, participated in coaching engagements, developed a new vision for their campus’s racial equity work, and launched their racial equity change effort with a comprehensive, prioritized action plan. The overall expected outcomes are increased student persistence and completion through an intentional design to eliminate structural barriers to equity.

ATD leads a growing network of more than 300 community colleges from 45 states committed to helping their students, particularly low-income students and students of color, achieve their goals for academic success, personal growth and economic opportunity.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College fights perception as Region XIV play begins

By Alan Dale | Courtesy of the Baytown Sun

It’s full steam ahead for Lee College athletes as it pertains to getting back on the court for the fall of 2021.

Both the basketball and volleyball team are in the midst of preparing to get respective rosters together following the shut down of athletics for the 2020-21 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic as the majority of other Region XIV teams begin competition. 

“All the coaches are out there actively recruiting for the upcoming season and nothing has changed from our original statement that we were suspending athletics for one year due to the pandemic,” Lee College athletic director Graeme Cox said. “Some of the coaches are saying they are hearing some weird things out there that really disappoints me that other people are talking smack and don’t even know what’s going on.

“Maybe that’s the world we live in now. I don’t understand why people would think that when we haven’t made an announcement and the coaches would not be recruiting and we wouldn’t be paying them to recruit a team if we weren’t going to have a team.”

Cox said the main issue is the rhetoric floating around that Lee College had or was planning to cut their athletic programs.

Roy Champagne, the men’s basketball coach, confirmed at least one recruit has hesitated on signing with the school until he knows for sure if the Rebels will play in the fall.

“Right now, it’s not shaping up good at all,” Champagne said. “We are actively recruiting, and there are kids interested in coming, but they are leery if there is a season, a team, or a program next year. That’s coming from them. Once perception becomes reality to them …

“Yes, we are actively recruiting and we actively recruited last year and we didn’t have a team and the season is being played. That’s the issue. Why go to Lee when you can go to 12 other schools in Region XIV that are playing?”

Champagne doesn’t know for sure where that stimulus is being created, but it could come from a lack of information put out since June from the college or his competitors could be disseminating such information as well.

“We have only put out one statement,” Champagne said. “I have been recruiting long enough and I know what tools (coaches) use and how they go about it.”

Champagne confirmed he has offered out a scholarship that is yet to be signed basically due to a wait-and-see approach.

Cox said the pandemic can still potentially change plans, saying, “you don’t know what’s going to happen, but we are moving forward and are optimistic that the vaccine is going to work and enough people will take the vaccine and the community is protected. We are just charging forward.”

Cox said the school is moving forward in its housing plans for athletes and upgrades being made to make sure that is a go.

“We are doing everything we can,” Cox said.

Essix has also been working the recruiting trail and said she has signed one player for next season, adding Texas City middle blocker Ashlynn Lewis, to the roster which still includes Barbers Hill alum Kylee Kejonen who remained at the school.

“I am doing my best to build the spots that I need to replace the players who transferred,” Essix said. “I would agree with Roy. It’s kind of like the players are holding out committing to see if they get another offer. Division I’s are not really recruiting right now.

“Junior colleges should get a lot of good players this year, but players are holding out to see if they get a Division I offer and that’s where I see some of the hesitation on my end.

The NCAA is currently playing the second half of its campaign,  backlogging many recruiting efforts.
“I am going off of what the administration told me,” Essix said. “They are saying they are planning to have a season and allowing us to recruit and to sign players. But it’s pretty fair for the players to feel that way as well because they want to play.”

Champagne has been teaching more classes and trying to recruit as much as he can. He also confirmed he is mulling the possibility of retirement. 

“I am eligible to retire as of May,” Champagne said. “I’ll be 52 years old this year, but I can coach until I am 75.”

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College announces new online real estate licensing programs

Baytown, TX – Lee College is now offering new, fully online Texas real estate licensing programs and continuing education courses (CEU’s).  Completion of the real estate programs prepares students for the Texas state licensing exams and enables them to begin their career as a real estate sales agent, broker or home inspector.

The real estate licensing programs are being offered through a partnership with The CE Shop, Inc., and will cover topics the state has deemed essential to practicing real estate in Texas. All programs are available entirely online in a self-paced format and taught by industry experts.

“We are excited to partner with The CE Shops to offer these trusted, high-quality real estate licensing programs,” said Marsha Tuha, executive director of Lee College’s Center for Workforce and Community Development. “Lee College is continually searching for the best, most efficient educational resources to benefit individuals in our community. Whether they are just starting out or making a career change, these new online programs will allow people to reach their career goals in a way that is convenient, relevant and affordable.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, real estate brokers and sales agents’ employment is projected to grow steadily between now and 2029. Individuals who register for the real estate programs through Lee College have the advantage of a local team dedicated to supporting them and answering any questions they may have through the completion of the programs.

In addition to courses for pre-licensed real estate agents and brokers, the new programs also offer convenient courses for current real estate agents and brokers to complete required continuing education courses (CEU’s).

To register for one of the programs or learn more about course offerings, call 281.425.6241 or visit the Center for Workforce and Community Development’s real estate programs website. https://www.lee.edu/workforce/ce/real-estate

Along with the real estate programs, Lee College’s Center for Workforce and Community Development offers a wide range of courses to fit students’ individual needs and career goals. The center provides various noncredit programs, including face-to-face, hybrid and online courses for those striving for personal, professional and business success. For more information, call 281-425-6311 or visit our website https://www.lee.edu/workforce.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College and Goose Creek CISD partner to offer free college tuition for 2020 grads

Baytown, TX – Lee College announced it is partnering with Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District (GCCISD) once again to offer free, full-time tuition this spring for all 2020 GCCISD graduates. Any student who graduated from GCCISD in 2020 is eligible.

“We are thrilled to partner with GCCISD to provide free, full-time tuition again this spring to 2020 graduates,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College president. “When we work together and put students first, great things happen in the community. We hope many students will take advantage of this outstanding opportunity to continue their education at no out of pocket cost to them.”

To receive the free full-time tuition, students must:

  • Be a 2020 graduate of GCCISD
  • Register for at least 12 semester credit hours (full-time) at Lee College for the Spring 2021 term
  • Complete the online Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) https://studentaid.gov/h/apply-for-aid/fafsa.

The free tuition waiver is considered a last-dollar scholarship program that covers the cost of tuition and fees at Lee College. “Last-dollar” means the scholarship kicks in after all other federal and state grant funding has been applied.

That is, if a student receives federal financial aid, those funds are used first, and then the waiver will cover the remaining costs towards tuition and fees. If the student does not receive financial aid, the Lee College tuition waiver will cover all tuition costs, excluding books.

This spring, Lee College will offer students four classroom delivery methods to accommodate their goals and learning style. These flexible options include online anytime, online with a schedule, hybrid and face-to-face.

To register and enroll for Spring 2021 classes, visit the Lee College website, or attend one of the in-person registration events on campus.

The deadline to register for spring classes at Lee College is January 12, 2021.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.