Youth camps now taking registrations

To register for any of these events, visit www.lee.edu/workforce/ or call 281.425.6311.

Aviation Camp

Soar into the world of aviation and create unforgettable memories! This one-day summer camp will introduce campers to the cutting edge of aviation and the basics of flight through a unique combination of fun and discovery.

Aviation Camp is open to children 10-15 years old, and it is held 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 3. The cost is $69, which includes lunch.

Camp participants will explore through education, team building, smart learning classrooms, hands-on activities, sophisticated flight simulations, and an adventurous tour at a local airport, where they will witness a day in the life of a pilot.

Participants also will gain skills to apply to in everyday life and discover the unlimited opportunities a career in aviation presents. Field trips will be to Texas Southern University and Hobby Airport. Close-toed shoes are required.

Youth Entrepreneur Camp

Do you have a great idea? Do you want to have your own business some day? If so, and if you’re between the ages of 12 and 16, this camp is for you!

The camp runs 1-4 p.m. Thursday, July 27, in room 351 of the ATC on Lee College’s main campus in Baytown.

Every good idea needs a plan. In this class you will explore business options and business plans for your unique ideas. You will learn how to develop your ideas, organize your facts, market your product/service and potentially make a profit. You learn hands-on about running a business by operating the campus Books and Beans store. At the end of this course, you will have a basic understanding of what’s needed to get your business off the ground and find investors!

Lunch is included in the $19 camp registration fee.

Let’s Keep it Real

Financial Education is a tool that no one can take from you. Let’s Keep it Real, an interactive financial presentation inspired by the game show Let’s Make a Deal, makes financial learning fun, while giving students an incentive to listen.

This free session takes place 9-10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 10, in the Bayer Conference Room of the main Lee College campus in Baytown.

Knowing that there are tangible prizes entices students to become engaged and retain the information presented to them at the moment, while they subconsciously absorb the facts that will ultimately make them winners at life. Let’s Keep it Real introduces financial knowledge regarding credit, budgeting, wants, needs, and other aspects of the world of finance.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 15 school systems. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College joining effort to help youth beat summer learning loss & prepare for fall

Mobile Go Center set to visit Roseland Park and Stratford Branch Library for July 13 event

Proclamation on Summer Learning Day
Baytown Mayor Stephen DonCarlos (center) presents a proclamation naming July 13, 2017, as Summer Learning Day to Lee College administrators and faculty at city hall. The college is partnering with Academic Beginnings for Children for Summer Learning Day to raise awareness of the importance of keeping kids learning, safe and healthy over the summer so they can return to school in the fall ready to succeed. Also pictured, from left: DeDe Griffith, Director of Access and Student Success; Treva Brown-Askey, chairwoman of the Developmental Education Division; Donna Mohlman, Special Projects Librarian and co-chairwoman of Academic Beginnings for Children; and Dr. Christina Ponce, Executive Vice President and member of the Kiwanis Club of Baytown.

BAYTOWN, TX — Lee College is working in the community to help local youth beat the damaging “summer slide”: the phenomenon where young people, often low-income, lose academic skills during summer vacation and fall behind their peers by the time the new school year begins.

The college is participating in National Summer Learning Day on July 13 in partnership with Academic Beginnings for Children (ABC), a broad-based coalition of education, civic, business and non-profit organizations working together to deliver the best solutions for children. The annual event is sponsored by the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) to raise awareness of the importance of keeping kids learning, safe and healthy over the summer to ensure they return to school in the fall ready to succeed.

On Summer Learning Day, the Lee College Mobile Go Center will be posted at Roseland Park in Baytown from 10-11 a.m., and the Stratford Branch Library in Highlands from 2-4 p.m. Students and families who climb aboard the center — a 42-foot, air-conditioned trailer equipped with high-speed Internet and other state-of-the-art technology — can enjoy e-books provided through a grant from the Delta Kappa Gamma Educational Foundation, and receive information about preparing for college. Children can also take a free paperback book home with them to read this summer, thanks to a $400 donation from the Kiwanis Club of Baytown, and participate in arts and crafts and other activities.

Lee College Mobile Go Center
Lee College Mobile Go Center

The Mobile Go Center will also be on hand throughout July and August at select locations where the Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District (GCCISD) serves free breakfast and lunch to children 1-18 years old. In addition to losing access to nutritious meals, the NSLA estimates that low-income youth lose two to three months in reading and math skills over the summer while their higher-income classmates tend to make slight gains. By fifth grade, those reading and math losses can leave low-income students two to three years behind their peers in school.

“Reading builds better brains. Providing opportunities for children to read during the summer helps build those connections in the brain,” said Donna Mohlman, special projects librarian for Lee College and co-chairwoman for ABC. “By partnering with the GCCISD Summer Meals Program, we are providing food for the body and food for the mind.”

For more information about National Summer Learning Day, ABC programs in the community or other summer meals events, contact Mohlman at dmmohlman@gmail.com. To learn more about the Lee College Mobile Go Center, which is available to come to various venues to assist potential students with higher education and workforce activities, visit www.lee.edu/bearebel.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 15 school systems. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Texas Nonprofit Theatres honors Lee for hosting youth conference

Dr. Dennis brown accepts the plaque on behalf of Lee.
Lee College received an award plaque this month from Texas Nonprofit Theatres for hosting the organization’s 22nd annual Youth Conference, which brought 400 young people from across the state to campus for a week of performances and workshops. Pictured, from left: Walter Stricklin, Performing Arts Center director; Dr. Veronique Tran, Vice President of Instruction; Dr. Onimi Wilcox, Dean of Academic Studies; Ryan Martin, production specialist; Pres. Dr. Dennis Brown; Kim Martin, technical theater instructor; and Mark Hall, vice chairman of the Board of Regents.

BAYTOWN, TX — Lee College earned recognition this month from Texas Nonprofit Theatres (TNT) for hosting its 22nd annual Youth Conference. The gathering brought 400 young thespians and their directors and chaperones from across the state to campus for a summer camp-style week of performances and workshops.

Kim Martin, technical theater instructor and an officer on the TNT Board of Governors, presented the honorary plaque from the organization at the June meeting of the Lee College Board of Regents. The 2017 TNT Youth Conference, held from June 6-11 at the Performing Arts Center and various buildings around campus, marked the second consecutive year that Lee College has been selected to host the event.

“The TNT executive committee and officers wanted to give deep gratitude to Lee College for the wonderful job of providing amazing facilities, extraordinary service and unwavering support as hosts,” Martin said. “They can’t stop telling me how wonderful this place is. I’m proud of that and proud to be with Lee College, and I want you to know people from around the state recognize that, too.”

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 15 school systems. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Youth tennis program revamped, relaunched

Philadelphia native Rob Coles was just 7 years old when he first picked up a tennis racket, embarking on what would become a 30-year career as a tennis player, coach and instructor at private clubs and community organizations across the country.

Rob Coles, tennis pro
Rob Coles, tennis pro

Now Coles is bringing his talent and passion for the sport he loves to Lee College as the new tennis professional, directing a revamped youth tennis program that kicked off this fall.

The tennis program will include private and group lessons for children aged 4-18 years, with an emphasis on helping students develop strong hand-eye coordination and proper footwork and movement. There will also be opportunities for free match play, junior team tennis and in-house competitions.

“Every class we do will be age and skill-level appropriate,” said Coles, who played tennis at Slippery Rock University. “The goal is to get all the kids playing — both with their peers in class, and against their peers in class.”

Coles was initially drawn to tennis because of his intense competitive spirit. After playing and coaching extensively from Pennsylvania to California and many states in between, he saw how the sport gave young people more than just the motivation to be their best. Through tennis, they also learn the value of hard work, patience and taking the time to think things through, he said.

“At higher levels, tennis becomes a moving chess match; there are many parallels between what happens on the court and what happens in life,” said Coles, who still keeps in touch with many of his pupils and maintains contacts at top collegiate programs. “With kids, you can see their growth as they create goals and achieve them. It’s really fun to watch their game get better and become part of their lives.”

For more information about the youth tennis program at Lee College, contact Coles at 281.425.6843 or rcoles@lee.edu.