Lee College Awarded Funds for Vocational Scholarships

Baytown, TX – Lee College was one of seven area colleges to receive part of a $300,000 award from the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo’s Vocational Scholarship Program. The 2020-2021 scholarship awards will benefit Lee College students pursuing degrees or certificates in Process Technology, Instrumentation Technology or Electrical Technology.

“We are excited to be selected for this award from the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo because of the lifelong impact it will have on the Lee College recipients,” said Fran Parent, Lee College director for the federal Perkins Grant. “Because of our expertise and strong partnerships with local industry, Lee College is the best choice for people who want to be successful in vocational careers. These scholarships will make it possible for even more students to take advantage of what we have to offer and help them build a solid future in their chosen vocational field.”

This is the sixth consecutive year Lee College has received funding through the scholarship program aimed at supporting non-traditional students in their pursuit of credit and non-credit training.

The other Houston-area colleges to received funding from the Vocational Scholarship Program include Houston Community College, Lamar Institute of Technology, Lone Star College, San Jacinto College, Texas State Technical College and Wharton County Junior College.

Current Lee College students can apply for the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo scholarship to cover tuition, fees and books. The deadline to apply for the scholarship is Wednesday, Sept. 30. Apply online at https://www.lee.edu/foundation/scholarships-for-students/index.php

Scholarship requirements:

  • Must be enrolled in Fall 2020 semester at Lee College
  • 2.0 GPA or higher
  • Complete online application
  • Must be a U.S. Citizen
  • Must be a Texas resident
  • Must have a declared major in Process Technology, Instrumentation Technology or Electrical technology.

If you have additional questions, email scholarships@lee.edu.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee awarded $1 million federal grant for Job Corps Scholars

Baytown, TX – Lee College has received a $1,182,574 grant from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) as part of the Job Corps Scholars Program, a new national demonstration project that provides at-risk youth and young adults with job skills instruction, educational opportunities and individualized employment counseling.

Lee College was one of 20 colleges and universities selected to receive the DOL Job Corps Scholars Program grant totaling nearly $24 million.

“It is an incredible honor to be awarded this grant from the U.S. Department of Labor,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College president. “This award is evidence of the hard-working, student-minded team we have here at Lee College. As a result of this amazing opportunity, our communities will prosper, and people’s lives will improve. That is at the very heart of higher education, and it encompasses everything we do at Lee College.”

The college will provide training in certificate programs for in-demand fields including welding, pipefitting and millwright that can be completed in less than one year at the McNair campus in Baytown.

There is still time for students to enroll in the program for the Fall 2020 semester. To be eligible for the Lee College Job Corps Scholar Program, students must be 16 to 24 years of age and demonstrate a financial need. Eligible students will receive financial assistance with tuition and fees. Students will also benefit from personal and employment counselors’ services to support them through the duration of the program and to guide them toward employment after they complete the program.

“The Job Corps Scholars Program provides all the skills and knowledge a student needs to begin a meaningful career in today’s economy,” said Dr. Veronique Tran, Lee College vice president of instruction. “The program sets students up for success, even in the face of adversity. We are grateful for this opportunity from the U.S. Department of Labor, and we are excited about what the future holds for our institution and for the students who take advantage of this spectacular program.”  

The first fast track program lasts 13 weeks and runs Sept. 14 through Dec. 9. The courses are being held Monday through Thursday, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the McNair Center in Baytown.

Courses will be offered with a combination of online instruction and hands-on labs following social distancing and safety procedures. For those who do not meet the eligibility criteria of the Job Corps Scholars Program, some seats will be available and students may apply for financial aid to assist with the cost of the program.

Sixty-five percent of the total costs of the Job Corps Scholars program will be financed with Federal money and 35 percent will be financed by non-governmental sources.

To find out more about the Job Corp Scholars Program, contact Frances Parent, fparent@lee.edu or 281.425.6456.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Kids at College Program Takes Virtual Learning to New Level

A child attends a virtual summer camp
Ethan, 10, learns Javascript while participating in a virtual summer kids camp via computer.

Baytown, TX – With community gatherings canceled, sports leagues sidelined and play dates nowhere in sight; many parents were left wondering how to keep their children engaged and entertained during the long summer months of the pandemic. The solution for several local families was the Lee College Center for Workforce and Community Development Kids at College summer program.

This summer, Lee College teamed up with Black Rocket, a national leader in tech education, to offer students virtual summer STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Camps.

Families were able to choose from a wide variety of cutting-edge courses with topics like coding, game design, eSports, virtual reality and more. Each week top teachers led students in live group classes, and then students convened into smaller breakout sessions with customized learning coaches.

As a bonus, Lee College offered $100 scholarships for up to three classes per student thanks to a generous gift from a local donor earlier this year.

Estefana White from Anahuac said the classes were a huge help for her family this summer, and thanks to the Lee College scholarship, her 10-year-old son Ethan was able to take three classes instead of one.

“We were so grateful for these classes, and the scholarship made it even better,” said White. “It was a big relief for us as parents to have something that we knew our son would enjoy learning about, but would also keep him engaged over the summer. These were the first STEM-related classes he has attended, and they really boosted his motivation to learn more.”

Thirteen-year-old Ciera from Baytown also completed three classes in Python programming, coding and JavaScript. Because Ciera aspires to be a software engineer when she grows up, she was excited to learn how to design video games and explore different programming languages first-hand.

Ciera’s mother, Billie Baker, believes the Kids at College program has started preparing her daughter for a successful STEM career.

“The earlier kids are exposed to these types of programs, the more comfortable they will become,” said Baker. “If kids can have direction and learn about technology at a young age, I believe they will have a better chance to succeed.”

From fine arts to creative writing to sports, Baker said she has always been impressed with Lee College’s wide variety of summer courses offered for kids. She said this summer was no exception with Lee College providing access to high-caliber classes that are typically more expensive on other learning sites.

“Not only are these classes an affordable and effective way for our kids to explore technology, but it helps them feel connected with a local college and gets them thinking about actually going to college one day.

“The pandemic has taught us that we need to learn the technology; you never know what’s going to happen. The Kids at College program establishes an easy pathway that can lead kids to career and academic success,” said Baker.

There is still one week remaining in the Summer 2020 Kids at College program, and the Lee College Center for Community and Workforce Development is planning a full list of virtual learning opportunities for Fall 2020 as well.

“The Kids at College Program provides an important outlet for children to learn while doing activities they love,” said Katherine Norland, Kids at College program manager. “We love hearing about the fantastic experiences our students had during our online summer courses and anticipate more amazing stories with the fall online learning opportunities.”

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College, Liberty ISD announce free college for 2020 graduates

Baytown, TX – The Lee College Board of Regents and the Liberty ISD school board approved implementation of a tuition supplement agreement to cover the cost of Lee College fall tuition and fees for the 2019-2020 graduates of Liberty ISD.

The agreement is an extension of the Supporting College Readiness Program developed earlier this summer between Baytown’s Goose Creek CISD School District and Lee College. As part of the agreement with Liberty ISD, Lee College will cover the cost of in-district tuition and fees for each participating student, and Liberty ISD will cover the remaining cost of out-of-district fees for each participating student. Those eligible for free tuition include December 2019 or June 2020 graduates who register full-time, or at least 12 credit hours at Lee College in the Fall 2020 semester.

To be eligible, students must:

  • Be a 2019-2020 graduate of Liberty ISD
  • Enroll in and maintain at least 12 credits at Lee College for the Fall 2020 semester
  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or the Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TASFA). 

This is a last-dollar scholarship program covering the cost of tuition and fees for Fall 2020 at Lee College, meaning the scholarship kicks in after all other grant and scholarship funding has been applied. In the event the student is awarded federal or Texas Public Education Grant money, that financial aid will be applied to the student account first. Lee College will then discount 56 percent of the balance, and Liberty ISD will be responsible for 44 percent of the remaining balance.

“We are incredibly excited to partner with Liberty ISD to help these new graduates succeed in higher education with no out of pocket costs to them,” said Lee College President, Dr. Lynda Villanueva. “It’s hard for families to justify the cost of attending four-year institutions this fall with all the uncertainties surrounding the pandemic. Especially now, the smart choice is for students to begin their quality education closer to home. With this free tuition program, students and their families have nothing to lose and everything to gain.”

The program will also benefit Liberty ISD students who choose to take advantage of it by providing encouragement and motivation for academic achievement as well as College, Career and Military Readiness (CCMR), furthering the goal of college readiness. In addition, it will support the goal of creating a local college-going culture.

“This is such an exciting new opportunity for Liberty High School graduates,” said Liberty ISD Superintendent, Dr. Cody Abshier. “The Liberty ISD Board of Trustees and district administrators are thankful to Lee College for their continuous efforts to provide practical educational opportunities to our students.  We are fortunate to be a partner with Lee College in so many meaningful endeavors, and we fully support them as they are now reaching out to our 2020 graduates with this fabulous offer.”

The Supporting College Readiness Program is a shared initiative by Lee College and local school districts to help overcome barriers faced by first-generation college going students to allow greater achievement among these groups of individuals. This program is intended, in part, to specifically target the barrier of affordability faced by these groups, and its implementation will be reflective of this shared goal.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College a partner in College Success for Single Mothers

Lee joins the National College Transition Network at World Education

Baytown, TX – Lee College is one of eight community colleges selected through a competitive application process to participate in College Success for Single Mothers. Funded by ECMC Foundation and led by the National College Transition Network (NCTN), the goal of the three-year project is to identify the needs of single-mother students on campus and develop a plan to expand key practices and services to enhance their college and career success. Lee College has convened a cross-functional task force of decision-makers, practitioners, and stakeholders to carry out the project’s activities and receive a $10,000 stipend. 

“By doing more to address the educational needs of our students who are single mothers, we believe Lee College is taking steps toward a more equitable society as a whole,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College President. “We are excited to participate in the national College Success for Single Mothers program, because educational success for single mothers makes a lasting difference not just in the lives of individuals, but for entire generations.”

Single mothers make up an increasing part of the post-secondary student population in the United States. Lee College believes the educational success of single mothers has the potential to reap intergenerational benefits, forging a path for economic mobility and success for their families.

“The CSSM grant is going to be a great opportunity for us to build on our current supports offered to student parents, especially our single mothers,” said Dr. Victoria Marron, Lee College’s Executive Director of Retention and Transition Services. “As a child raised by a single mother, I can attest to the struggle and advocacy needed for this population of students, including of single-fathers. This is truly exciting, and I am honored to lead the college and our task force on this project as we increase institutional capacity, advocacy, and resources for these students.”  

Marron said Lee College’s commitment to addressing the needs of single mothers and student parents is essential to its core values of equity and student success for all students regardless of their background.

To achieve the project goals, the National College Transition Network (NCTN) is partnering with the Program Evaluation and Research Group at Endicott College, developers of the Family Friendly Campus Toolkit: Using Data to Improve Outcomes, and Achieving the Dream, a national leader in community college reform. These two organizations complement NCTN’s expertise designing effective college and career pathways for adult learners. 

College Success for Single Mothers builds on NCTN’s 2019 report, No Matter What Obstacle is Thrown My Way, which documents examples of 17 community colleges that offer targeted programming for student parents. The report recommends that significant work remains to increase institutional capacity to collect data to identify single mothers on campus; provide professional development to faculty and staff on the needs of single mothers; develop diverse and flexible funding sources; and advocate for policies within and outside of the institutions that support single mothers.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. 

Lee suspends athletics season because of pandemic

Lee College announced June 22, 2020, it is suspending its athletic season for the 2020-21 academic year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

All practices, scrimmages, games, tournaments and community activities conducted by the school’s athletics programs are suspended.

“We are faced with extraordinary circumstances as the nature of this pandemic is rapidly changing,” said Lee College President Dr. Lynda Villanueva. “We are all very sad to have to miss a year of excitement and competition, but the safety of our students and staff is of utmost importance, and we see very little possibility for our athletes to safely practice, play, and travel together in the upcoming year. Every decision that we have made including this one has been the result of much consideration and careful alignment with the guidance and recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and local health officials.

“Given these circumstances, Lee College will continue to work with our student athletes to ensure that each student will be able to meet their educational goals as planned. Lee College faculty and staff stand ready to help students adjust to these new measures for as long as necessary.”

Lee College also announced all student-athletes enrolled on a team roster “in good standing” during the 2019-20 academic year and all athletes who signed a National Junior College Athletic Association letter of intent to attend Lee College and participate on a team during the 2020-21 academic year will receive:

  1. Guaranteed Free Tuition and Regular Fees: With Federal Financial Aid grants and Lee College scholarships (as needed), each eligible student athlete who studies at Lee College will be guaranteed paid tuition and fees for up to 36 credit hours for enrolling between now and the end of Spring Term 2021 classes.
  2. Direct Support from Lee College to support their academic progress: Lee College Athletic Department staff and other Lee College employees will continue to support and provide guidance to student-athletes, while carefully tracking their academic progress.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College, Goose Creek ISD announce free college tuition for 2020 graduates

Baytown, TX – The Lee College Board of Regents and Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District (GCCISD) Thursday approved implementation of a new program to cover the cost of Lee College fall tuition and fees for the 2019-2020 graduates of GCCISD.

Under the new Supporting College Readiness Program, GCCISD and Lee College will split equally the cost of tuition and fees for eligible students. Those eligible for free tuition include December 2019 or June 2020 graduates of GCCISD who register to take at least 12 credit hours at Lee College in the Fall 2020 semester.

To be eligible, students must:

  • Be a GCCISD 2019-2020 graduate
  • Enroll in and maintain at least 12 credits at Lee College for the Fall 2020 semester
  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or the Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TASFA).

This is a last-dollar scholarship program covering the cost of tuition and fees for Fall 2020 at Lee College, meaning the scholarship kicks in after all other grant and scholarship funding has been applied.

“Lee College is proud to join forces with GCCISD to help students take that first step in reaching their goals of achieving a higher education,” said Lee College President, Dr. Lynda Villanueva. “We know many people are struggling with finances right now as a result of COVID-19 and they might think they can’t afford to go to college. Together with GCCISD, we are effectively removing those financial barriers so new GCCISD high school graduates can begin the journey towards an associate degree or certificate—with no out-of-pocket costs to them. The time to begin this journey is now. We want these students to know they belong in college, and they belong at Lee College.”

The program also will benefit Goose Creek CISD students who choose to take advantage of it by providing encouragement and motivation for academic achievement as well as College, Career and Military Readiness (CCMR), furthering the District’s goal of post-secondary readiness. In addition, it will support the goal of creating a local college going culture.

“This partnership between Lee College and Goose Creek CISD provides an amazing opportunity for our Goose Creek CISD graduates to experience a semester of college at no cost as some students are deferred by financial restraints and others by fear of the unknown,” said Goose Creek CISD superintendent Dr. Randal O’Brien. “We are so grateful for the support our friends at Lee College provide for our District, and we look forward to continuing to work together to help our students overcome the obstacles and achieve their goals.”

The Supporting College Readiness Program is a shared initiative by Lee College and GCCISD to help overcome barriers faced by first-generation college going students to allow greater achievement among these groups of individuals. This program is intended, in part, to specifically target the barrier of affordability faced by these groups, and its implementation will be reflective of this shared goal.

There are seven high schools within GCCISD including Peter E. Hyland Center, IMPACT Early College High School, Robert E. Lee High School, Goose Creek Memorial High School, POINT Alternative Center, Ross S. Sterling High School and Stuart Career Tech High School. GCCISD had approximately 1,600 graduates in June 2020.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College instructor sews, donates 300 face masks to college

Tammy Gross sews masks
Tammy Gross

In a sun-filled craft room surrounded by towering stacks of broadcloth and color-coded bobbins, the whirr of a sewing machine fills the air as Tammy Gross quietly works to help fight a pandemic the best way she knows how. Since March 2020, Tammy has been sewing and donating protective facemasks for people who need them to help combat the spread of COVID-19. So far, she has crafted over 1,300 masks.

“I like to make quilts, so I already had a good amount of material,” said Tammy. “Then, a friend asked me to make a few masks for local healthcare workers and people in need. I realized that in a pandemic, everyone is in need. So it just expanded from there.”

Before retiring in December 2019, Tammy was the lead instructor for CAD and process pipe design at Lee College, where she still teaches part-time as an adjunct instructor. Tammy recently donated 300 masks to the College for any student, instructor or staff member who needs them in preparation for the fall semester, calling it a “labor of love.”

“I love Lee College as my alma mater and my family of coworkers and students,” said Tammy. “Since summer classes have started and we are looking forward to the fall semester, I am more than happy to make these masks for those who need them on campus.”

Since several paused Spring 2020 classes resumed on May 18, Lee College has implemented a number of safety and health regulations to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on campus. All campus visitors, including students and instructors, are required to wear face coverings as defined by the U.S. Center for Disease Control.

“Tammy is a picture of the caring and dedicated community we have here at Lee College,” said Dr. Veronique Tran, Lee College vice president of Instruction. “Education is about nurturing the whole person, and Tammy’s generous donation will help make that possible for many people on our campus.”

Each of Tammy’s homemade masks uses three layers of high thread count cotton material and elastic and takes about 20 minutes to assemble from start to finish. Tammy never charges people for her masks but says she has received donations from several people to help cover the cost of materials.

While she has donated masks to everyone from friends, to nursing home residents, to grocery store employees, Tammy says her most memorable donations were to the Houston Methodist Baytown Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the psychiatric hospital.

“I want to do what I can to help keep people safe,” said Tammy. “Not everyone can sew, and I saw a real need there. I just felt driven to help.” Tammy lives in Crosby, Texas, with her husband.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Summer enrollment soars to record numbers

Baytown, TX – Lee College enrollment this summer has reached nearly 5,000 students making it the largest summer enrollment in the College’s 86-year history. Up nearly 50 percent from this time last year, student summer enrollment is climbing as well as the number of credit hours students are taking.

“While other colleges and universities are struggling with enrollment right now, the news of our record enrollment gives us hope and excitement for the future,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College President. “However, numbers represent more than statistics or a line on a graph. Lee College cares about the community and we are continuously innovating around the pandemic to meet each individual where they are and help them succeed. Now is the time for people to go to college and not delay their dreams for higher education.”

All Lee College classes were transitioned online in March 2020 with the exception of hands-on classes, which were resumed in May. Since then the College has provided technology assistance as well as emergency financial support for students in need. Last April, the Lee College Board of Regents approved a plan to utilize more than $2 million in funding from the federal stimulus to pay for qualifying students’ tuition, e-books and fees for the Summer 2020 semester.

“While free tuition has been a driver for the College’s high enrollment, the certainty that higher education and training can provide is empowering, which has greatly supported our enrollment,” said Dr. Donnetta Suchon, Vice President of Student Affairs at Lee College. “I think more people are seeing that higher education is an effective pathway into gaining new skills and preparing for new careers in an ever-changing environment.”

Most students enrolled at Lee College this summer are first-time college students under the age of 20, but the College continues to see growth across all areas and student backgrounds. According to the registrar’s office, 60 to 70 percent of students enrolled in the summer typically choose to continue their education at Lee College in the fall.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Presidential Honors Day list announced for 2020

Lee College recently announced its 2020 Presidential Honors Day Honorees, a tradition at the College for the past 30 years. Presidential Honors Day distinguishes the top student in each academic and applied science discipline program at Lee College. Honorees are nominated by their instructors and, in cases when there are multiple nominations, voted on by the instructors in that division or program. Students can be nominated for exceptional grades and academic mastery in the classroom, as well as exhibiting high levels of integrity and perseverance in their educational pursuit.

During the celebration, honorees’ friends, families, and instructors come together to praise their triumphs and hard-earned victories from the past year. This year, however, among virtual classrooms and social distancing, the gatherings will be much smaller and will most likely include only people living under the same roof. Even still, the title remains one of the highest honors at the College. And that is a big reason to celebrate.

“These students have worked exceptionally hard to earn this honor, and our entire community could not be prouder of them,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College President. “Their achievements are a bright light in the midst of these uncertain times, and we are celebrating with them even if it is from afar. I hope they know how sincerely proud we are of them and all they have accomplished at Lee College. We cannot wait to see what the future holds for these honorees.”

To commemorate this distinction, all 2020 Honorees will receive a personalized letter of congratulations from President Villanueva, and a special certificate of achievement delivered to their home address.

“These students have gone above and beyond in academic excellence, hard work, leadership, and influence in their classrooms and programs,” said Dr. Georgeann Ward, Honors Program Coordinator for Lee College. “For some students, Honors Day is the first time that they have had such recognition, and it opens up the possibilities they imagine for themselves. Although we aren’t able to gather together for the formal celebration, I hope the students understand how proud Lee College is of them.”

Congratulations to the 2020 Lee College Presidential Honors Day Honorees:

  • Ashley Bliss, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselors Program
  • Brittney Bomar, Computer-Aided Drafting & Design
  • Michael Bond, Process Technology
  • Kelby Buchanan, Volleyball
  • Jessica Burrows, Analytical Instrumentation
  • Victoria Burwell, Teacher Education
  • Marco Cardenas, Chemistry
  • Julio Cesar Chacon, Safety Management
  • Lesly Chavez, Sociology
  • Christina Contreras, Developmental Math
  • John T. Elliott, Electrical Technology
  • Adam Fontenot, Mathematics STEM Pathway
  • Adanna Frazier, Mathematics Non-STEM Pathway
  • Melissa Gill, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Program
  • Joey Isaac Guerrero, Computer Maintenance Technology
  • Amy Halik, Child Development
  • Scott Helms, Kinesiology
  • Nathan Howard, Applied General Chemistry
  • Jesus Rodriguez Jaime, Industrial Instrumentation
  • Pamela Johnson, Economics
  • Cynthia Justice, Health Information Technology
  • Melody Land, Vocational Nursing
  • Ryan Lara, American Studies
  • Melanie Leal, History
  • Monica Erin Lilley, SocialWork
  • Melissa Mar, Freshman Composition
  • Julio Martinez, Speech
  • Juan Nevarez Martinez, Computer & Graphics Technology
  • Cristina McMillin, Anatomy & Physiology
  • Bryan Medina, Psychology
  • Karlynn Miller, Environmental Sciences
  • Aquila Mitchell, Humanities
  • Karen Montemayor, Drafting
  • Daniel Mullins, Process Pipe Design
  • Izailah Ortuna, Philosophy
  • Izailah Ortuna, Accounting Technology
  • Richard Perdomo, Instrumentation Technology
  • Dani Perry, Sophomore Literature
  • Elizabeth Powell, Theater Arts
  • Avinash Rambarran, The Human Condition
  • Israel Robles, Photography
  • David Rodriguez, Welding Inspection
  • Andrea Rogers, Government
  • Zuleymma Saldana, Associate Degree of Nursing
  • Jeremy Salinas, Manufacturing Engineering Technology
  • Keyma Sanchez, Learning Strategies
  • Ashlyn Scheller, Business Administration
  • Aldo Simental, Developmental English
  • Larissa Solis, Art
  • Madison Steadham, Business Management
  • Grace Ann Strouhal, Music-Piano
  • Grace Ann Strouhal, Music-Vocal
  • Nicholas Washington, Music Instrumental