LC students get edge with INEOS simulator

Baytown, TX – Lee College analytics technology and measurements students will receive hands-on training and be better prepared to successfully enter the workforce thanks to a generous donation from INEOS Olefins & Polymers USA (“INEOS”).

Four people standing in front of the analyzer shed. Robert Bradshaw, Site Manager, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex; Dr. Lynda Villanueva, President, Lee College; Marsha Tuha, Executive Director, Lee College Center for Workforce & Community Development; Dave Lierman, Maintenance Supervisor, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex.
(Left to right): Robert Bradshaw, Site Manager, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex; Dr. Lynda Villanueva, President, Lee College; Marsha Tuha, Executive Director, Lee College Center for Workforce & Community Development; Dave Lierman, Maintenance Supervisor, INEOS Olefins & Polymers Battleground Manufacturing Complex.

Last December, INEOS donated an analyzer shelter to Lee College for students who are actively learning about analyzer readings and process operations in the chemical plant industry. Lee College is the only college in the Houston area with a training facility of its kind.

“A motivated, well trained technical workforce is incumbent to safe and reliable operations of our facilities,” said Robert (Bob) Bradshaw, Site Manager for the INEOS Battleground Manufacturing Complex in La Porte. “We at INEOS are proud to partner with Lee College to provide quality educational opportunities which lead to gainful employment for the next generation in our community.”

Most modern chemical plants use analyzer shelters to provide a controlled environment to test and control end products. The analyzer shelter is a container-type structure that protects the measurement components from adverse conditions that can affect analyzer readings.

“Lee College is excited to enhance our Analytical program with the donation from INEOS that allows real-world preparation and hands-on exposure to the actual equipment students will encounter while working in the field,” said Marsha Tuha, executive director of Lee College’s Center for Workforce and Community Development. “When hiring Lee College graduates, employers can be confident their employees received thorough, high-quality training because of resources like the analyzer shelter.”

The analyzer shelter at Lee College will accommodate the components necessary to teach analyzer technology in a real-world setting. Several high demand classes will use the analyzer shelter, including:

  • 16-hour Analyzer troubleshooting
  • 40-hour Introduction to Analyzer training
  • Introduction to Sample Systems
  • Chromatography

Lee College’s Advanced Technical Training Center offers fast-track courses and customized programs for nearly every industry. To learn more about the analytics technology and measurements and other high-demand degrees and certificate programs enrolling now, go to www.lee.edu/workforce.


Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

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LC chosen for Racial Equity Leadership Academy

Baytown, TX – Lee College is one of 10 colleges selected to participate in the national Achieving the Dream (ATD) and the University of Southern California (USC) Race and Equity Center Racial Equity Leadership Academy (RELA), a year-long program scheduled to begin in summer 2021. The intensive program is designed to support teams of five individuals from each college in the development of a bold, strategic racial equity plan to implement actionable solutions at their institutions.

“We are excited to be part of the RELA program. Our students are at the heart of everything we do, and participation in this program will allow us to provide the best possible learning experience for our traditionally underserved student populations,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College president.

Other colleges selected for the program included Anne Arundel Community College (MD); Austin Community College District (TX); Broward College (FL); Chattanooga State Community College (TN); Columbus State Community College (OH); Kingsborough Community College (NY); Montgomery County Community College (PA); Mott Community College (MI); and Pierce College (WA).

With programming based on ATD’s Institutional Capacity Framework and tailored to community colleges working to overcome equity-focused challenges, RELA will occur July 26–29, 2021. College teams will work together to develop a strategic racial equity change effort that will launch at each institution during the Fall 2021 semester.

“Our goal is to serve traditionally marginalized student populations and their families by removing systemic barriers and empowering their success,” said Dr. Victoria Marron, Lee College’s Associate Vice President of Retention and Transition Services and Chief Equity Officer. “This program will help equip us to make that goal a reality.”

By the end of RELA, teams from each college will have identified a racial equity change effort, participated in coaching engagements, developed a new vision for their campus’s racial equity work, and launched their racial equity change effort with a comprehensive, prioritized action plan. The overall expected outcomes are increased student persistence and completion through an intentional design to eliminate structural barriers to equity.

ATD leads a growing network of more than 300 community colleges from 45 states committed to helping their students, particularly low-income students and students of color, achieve their goals for academic success, personal growth and economic opportunity.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College fights perception as Region XIV play begins

By Alan Dale | Courtesy of the Baytown Sun

It’s full steam ahead for Lee College athletes as it pertains to getting back on the court for the fall of 2021.

Both the basketball and volleyball team are in the midst of preparing to get respective rosters together following the shut down of athletics for the 2020-21 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic as the majority of other Region XIV teams begin competition. 

“All the coaches are out there actively recruiting for the upcoming season and nothing has changed from our original statement that we were suspending athletics for one year due to the pandemic,” Lee College athletic director Graeme Cox said. “Some of the coaches are saying they are hearing some weird things out there that really disappoints me that other people are talking smack and don’t even know what’s going on.

“Maybe that’s the world we live in now. I don’t understand why people would think that when we haven’t made an announcement and the coaches would not be recruiting and we wouldn’t be paying them to recruit a team if we weren’t going to have a team.”

Cox said the main issue is the rhetoric floating around that Lee College had or was planning to cut their athletic programs.

Roy Champagne, the men’s basketball coach, confirmed at least one recruit has hesitated on signing with the school until he knows for sure if the Rebels will play in the fall.

“Right now, it’s not shaping up good at all,” Champagne said. “We are actively recruiting, and there are kids interested in coming, but they are leery if there is a season, a team, or a program next year. That’s coming from them. Once perception becomes reality to them …

“Yes, we are actively recruiting and we actively recruited last year and we didn’t have a team and the season is being played. That’s the issue. Why go to Lee when you can go to 12 other schools in Region XIV that are playing?”

Champagne doesn’t know for sure where that stimulus is being created, but it could come from a lack of information put out since June from the college or his competitors could be disseminating such information as well.

“We have only put out one statement,” Champagne said. “I have been recruiting long enough and I know what tools (coaches) use and how they go about it.”

Champagne confirmed he has offered out a scholarship that is yet to be signed basically due to a wait-and-see approach.

Cox said the pandemic can still potentially change plans, saying, “you don’t know what’s going to happen, but we are moving forward and are optimistic that the vaccine is going to work and enough people will take the vaccine and the community is protected. We are just charging forward.”

Cox said the school is moving forward in its housing plans for athletes and upgrades being made to make sure that is a go.

“We are doing everything we can,” Cox said.

Essix has also been working the recruiting trail and said she has signed one player for next season, adding Texas City middle blocker Ashlynn Lewis, to the roster which still includes Barbers Hill alum Kylee Kejonen who remained at the school.

“I am doing my best to build the spots that I need to replace the players who transferred,” Essix said. “I would agree with Roy. It’s kind of like the players are holding out committing to see if they get another offer. Division I’s are not really recruiting right now.

“Junior colleges should get a lot of good players this year, but players are holding out to see if they get a Division I offer and that’s where I see some of the hesitation on my end.

The NCAA is currently playing the second half of its campaign,  backlogging many recruiting efforts.
“I am going off of what the administration told me,” Essix said. “They are saying they are planning to have a season and allowing us to recruit and to sign players. But it’s pretty fair for the players to feel that way as well because they want to play.”

Champagne has been teaching more classes and trying to recruit as much as he can. He also confirmed he is mulling the possibility of retirement. 

“I am eligible to retire as of May,” Champagne said. “I’ll be 52 years old this year, but I can coach until I am 75.”

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College announces new online real estate licensing programs

Baytown, TX – Lee College is now offering new, fully online Texas real estate licensing programs and continuing education courses (CEU’s).  Completion of the real estate programs prepares students for the Texas state licensing exams and enables them to begin their career as a real estate sales agent, broker or home inspector.

The real estate licensing programs are being offered through a partnership with The CE Shop, Inc., and will cover topics the state has deemed essential to practicing real estate in Texas. All programs are available entirely online in a self-paced format and taught by industry experts.

“We are excited to partner with The CE Shops to offer these trusted, high-quality real estate licensing programs,” said Marsha Tuha, executive director of Lee College’s Center for Workforce and Community Development. “Lee College is continually searching for the best, most efficient educational resources to benefit individuals in our community. Whether they are just starting out or making a career change, these new online programs will allow people to reach their career goals in a way that is convenient, relevant and affordable.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, real estate brokers and sales agents’ employment is projected to grow steadily between now and 2029. Individuals who register for the real estate programs through Lee College have the advantage of a local team dedicated to supporting them and answering any questions they may have through the completion of the programs.

In addition to courses for pre-licensed real estate agents and brokers, the new programs also offer convenient courses for current real estate agents and brokers to complete required continuing education courses (CEU’s).

To register for one of the programs or learn more about course offerings, call 281.425.6241 or visit the Center for Workforce and Community Development’s real estate programs website. https://www.lee.edu/workforce/ce/real-estate

Along with the real estate programs, Lee College’s Center for Workforce and Community Development offers a wide range of courses to fit students’ individual needs and career goals. The center provides various noncredit programs, including face-to-face, hybrid and online courses for those striving for personal, professional and business success. For more information, call 281-425-6311 or visit our website https://www.lee.edu/workforce.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee College and Goose Creek CISD partner to offer free college tuition for 2020 grads

Baytown, TX – Lee College announced it is partnering with Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District (GCCISD) once again to offer free, full-time tuition this spring for all 2020 GCCISD graduates. Any student who graduated from GCCISD in 2020 is eligible.

“We are thrilled to partner with GCCISD to provide free, full-time tuition again this spring to 2020 graduates,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College president. “When we work together and put students first, great things happen in the community. We hope many students will take advantage of this outstanding opportunity to continue their education at no out of pocket cost to them.”

To receive the free full-time tuition, students must:

  • Be a 2020 graduate of GCCISD
  • Register for at least 12 semester credit hours (full-time) at Lee College for the Spring 2021 term
  • Complete the online Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) https://studentaid.gov/h/apply-for-aid/fafsa.

The free tuition waiver is considered a last-dollar scholarship program that covers the cost of tuition and fees at Lee College. “Last-dollar” means the scholarship kicks in after all other federal and state grant funding has been applied.

That is, if a student receives federal financial aid, those funds are used first, and then the waiver will cover the remaining costs towards tuition and fees. If the student does not receive financial aid, the Lee College tuition waiver will cover all tuition costs, excluding books.

This spring, Lee College will offer students four classroom delivery methods to accommodate their goals and learning style. These flexible options include online anytime, online with a schedule, hybrid and face-to-face.

To register and enroll for Spring 2021 classes, visit the Lee College website, or attend one of the in-person registration events on campus.

The deadline to register for spring classes at Lee College is January 12, 2021.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Alumni donate $20K in endowed scholarships to college foundation

Posed shot of donors with donation check

Baytown, TX – Many Lee College students will achieve their lifelong dream of higher education without debt thanks to the generosity of longtime Lee College supporters, Bennie and David Kadjar. Recently, the philanthropist couple gifted the Lee College Foundation with a total of $20,000 in endowed scholarships including one endowed tuition scholarship and two endowed textbook scholarships.

“Lee College is extremely grateful to have the dedicated support of people like Bennie and David Kadjar who share our passion for education and our desire to make college more accessible to everyone,” said Lee College President, Dr. Lynda Villanueva. “It is evident the Kadjar’s give from their hearts, and this generous gift to the Lee College Foundation will make a lasting and meaningful impact on students and their families for generations to come.”

Bennie and David Kadjar have been avid supporters of the Lee College Foundation for many years and have contributed consistently to the annual Lee College Foundation fundraising gala in the form of sponsorships and items for the silent auction. They have also given to scholarship initiatives and capital campaigns.

“Lee College is part of us,” said David. “It’s close to our hearts because we both went to college here, and so did our children.”

Each year, Bennie and David attend the Lee College Foundation Scholarship Breakfast to meet the student recipients of the scholarships named in Bennie’s mother, Edna Gray’s memory, as well as the scholarships in honor of the Kadjar family and in memory of their son, Douglas Mirza Kadjar.

“In the past, we’ve had the opportunity to meet a lot of our scholarship recipients, and we know how much it means to each of them,” David said. “We feel it is absolutely a good return on our investment.”

Although it has been a tough year for traditional fundraising because of COVID-19 restrictions, David said that’s all the more reason to continue to give to such a worthy cause as the Lee College Foundation.

“Scholarships lead to completed education, which leads to better employment, and in turn, better lives for people and their families,” he said. “It’s just our little way of helping out.”

In addition to their continued financial support to Lee College, the couple also believes in donating their time to help the institution thrive. David served as an inaugural board member of the Lee College Alliance Alumni and Friends Association, and both he and Bennie are lifetime alumni association members.

Following in the footsteps of her mother, Edna Gray, who served three decades on the Lee College Foundation board and served as Chairman of the Board from 1987-89, Bennie has served on the Lee College Foundation Board for 21 years and as chairman of the board in 2012 and 2013. She has also served on fundraising and scholarship committees for the foundation board.

The Kadjar-Gray family fountain located at the center of the Lee College campus in Baytown was established in 2005 as a joint contribution from both families. The scenic fountain is still enjoyed today by faculty, staff, students, and visitors on campus.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee celebrates 20th anniversary of The Human Condition

Former Lee College students (from left) Debbie Long, Christian Morrell, and Jessie Selph.

Baytown, TX – Debbie Long walked into the college classroom and nearly changed her mind. As a non-traditional student, Long began taking classes at Lee College later in life after her children were grown and out of the house. Initially, she was concerned about the age difference between her and her peers, but one course helped her find her voice and gave her the newfound confidence she needed to finish her degree plan.

“I didn’t have much confidence when I started going back to school,” said Long. “I definitely felt the age difference. But the Human Condition class felt like a safe place to share ideas and to learn from each other. Despite our differences, everyone in the class became good friends and accepted each other for who we were. The instructors were amazing and gave me the confidence that pushed me to do things I never thought I could do. I’ve never experienced anything like it.”

This month, Lee College celebrates 20 years of the Human Condition: a unique, critical-thinking seminar within the Lee College Honors Program. Developed in 2000, the academically advanced team-taught course has challenged Lee College students for more than two decades to question the world around them through analysis of various literature and art forms.

“The goal of the class is not to change students’ minds. The goal is to teach them to consider different perspectives and understand why they believe what they believe,” said Dr. Georgeann Ward, Lee College Honors Program coordinator and lead instructor for the Human Condition. “We want students to learn how to have tough discussions and consider perspectives they didn’t think about before to then form their own beliefs. These are essential skills, and I can’t think of a more important time in history for students to question and investigate the information they receive.”

Each unit begins with a study of social theory or philosophy that provides insight into human behavior. Students then apply these theoretical “lenses” to various texts, including literature, film, art, architecture, and field experiences. At the end of the semester, students complete a seminar paper and present their work to the college community and often at local, regional and national conferences.

Ward said the reading and writing-intensive course is fundamentally different from typical college courses because the instructors are never standing at a podium delivering a lecture. Instead, the entire class collaborates in search of knowledge. 

“In the Human Condition, [the instructors] are not merely the depositors of knowledge, but we are looking to students to bring their questions and drive the discussion,” said Ward. “Everyone in the room is on an equal plane at all times as makers of knowledge.”

“For some students, this is a life-changing course because it gives them brand new perspectives and opens the door for academic opportunities they might not have thought were possible,” said Ward.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Lee receives $10,000 grant from Jay and Kay Eshbach Foundation

From left, Lee College President Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Kay Eshbach, and Lori Eshbach Comanich. (Photo by The Baytown Sun.)

Lee College recently received a $10,000 donation from the Jay and Kay Eshbach Foundation to help students manage financial challenges through the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

The gift will go directly to the Lee Cares emergency fund. It will provide Lee College students funding to help cover the cost of necessary expenses that could prevent them from finishing their education, such as medical costs, housing, childcare and food insecurities.

“We are extremely grateful for this generous donation from the Jay and Kay Eshbach Foundation,” said Dr. Lynda Villanueva, Lee College president. “As a public-serving institution, Lee College decided early on during the pandemic that we would do whatever it took to help all students succeed during this strenuous time. Because of this selfless gift, we are now that much closer to achieving that which we’ve set out to do.”

Jay Eshbach, president of the Jay and Kay Eshbach Foundation and founder of Eshbach Retirement Planning in Baytown, hopes this donation will help Lee College students overcome financial barriers to achieve their higher education goals.   

“One of the Eshbach Foundation’s core values is to be there when people need us,” he said. “We hope during these difficult times, the grant will help to keep hard-working students on the path toward graduation, even in the midst of many financial pressures.”  

So far, more than $150,000 in private donations to the Lee Cares emergency fund has been distributed to students who need help paying for basic needs as the result of job losses or other financial difficulties surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. Current Lee College students can apply for Lee Cares scholarships online at https://lee.academicworks.com/opportunities/11144.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.

Auto dealers donate $200K to local groups

By Michael Pineda / Baytown Sun
michael.pineda@baytownsun.com

Roger and Kim Elswick pose before their business
Roger and Kim Elswick

The Baytown Chamber of Commerce had its October Business Exchange Thursday, but it was the charity of Roger and Kim Elswick that stole the show.

The Elswick Automotive owners announced donations of just under $200,000 to benefit community charities, along with funding that will go toward feeding families for a week. Roger Elswick said the business had taken a hit early in the pandemic but has recovered in recent months, allowing the opportunity to give back.

“It’s a new thing,” he said. My wife and I have felt that throughout all that has gone on in the pandemic, a lot of people have been struggling, and we have been blessed, and we wanted to help. We picked the organizations that could benefit from the donation that has been most affected or provided services for the community.”

The Rotary Club received a $4,500 donation after the cancellation of its main fundraiser, the Annual Shrimp and Catfish Festival. Missouri Street Church of Christ received $10,000 for its food pantry. Also receiving $10,000 was Project Blue and the Pregnancy Resource Center. Bridge Over Troubled Waters received $17,500, while the Lee College Foundation was given $30,000 to supplement CARES Act funding that allowed for education assistance.

An estimated $115,000 will go toward feeding families of four for a week. Food will be dispersed on dates in October, November and December. In announcing the donations, Kim Elswick said the couple had been fortunate their business had not been affected.

“We feel we’ve been called by God to give back in every way we can,” she said. “We’re extremely blessed to be part of this community and are thankful for the support that allows us to expand and return that blessing, at least in part, to the Baytown area.”

Among those on hand to accept for the Missouri Church of Christ was Kim Martin, an elder with the congregation who is active in its food ministry. He said 150 people are fed each week through its pantry. Martin said they have to ask people their income as part of its services, and a lot of people have answered $0.

“We tell them our hearts are with you,” Martin said. “This will help so much.”

Project Blue, founded by Mary Zaruba Pinney in memory of her brother Marcus, is operated by Mark Pinney and Dr. Jim Zaruba after her untimely passing. Proceeds go toward helping police officers who face serious illness or injuries outside of their duties. It has donated over $280,000 to officers and hosts the Jailbreak Run.

The Pregnancy Resource Center offers realistic alternatives to abortion. It had to cancel its golf tournament fundraiser due to the pandemic. Bridge Over Troubled Waters assists victims of domestic violence, which has increased since stay-at-home mandates were enacted.

Lee College will be able to use its donation to help students impacted by the pandemic. Dr. Lynda Villanueva, president of the college, gave credit to board members for taking steps to innovate in response to the pandemic. She said the donation will allow more students to pursue their academic endeavors.

The Elswicks have enlisted help from others to fulfill its goal of feeding Baytown families. The plan is to feed 1,250 families, with 250 on Oct. 17, 400 on Nov. 21, and 600 on Dec. 19. Faith Family Church has been recruited for its expertise in food dispersal. Kroger will bag the food and transport to the church, while Wismer Distributing will offer usage of a refrigerated truck. The Kiwanis Club is also helping, selling 300 cases of apples at a discounted rate and supplying volunteers to bag them during distribution of food.

Elswick Automotive, which is building a new facility, Community Honda off the I-10 East access road between Garth Road and East Main, has remained active in support of the community prior to announcement of the donations. Most recently it made a donation to the Baytown Chamber Capital Campaign helping provide to the realization of construction of a new building. It has also helped under the radar, donating air scrubbers to the ventilation system of Baytown Little Theater, which allowed it to reopen.

“We are just very blessed, and we give all to the glory of God,” Roger Elswick said.

Lee College Awarded Funds for Vocational Scholarships

Baytown, TX – Lee College was one of seven area colleges to receive part of a $300,000 award from the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo’s Vocational Scholarship Program. The 2020-2021 scholarship awards will benefit Lee College students pursuing degrees or certificates in Process Technology, Instrumentation Technology or Electrical Technology.

“We are excited to be selected for this award from the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo because of the lifelong impact it will have on the Lee College recipients,” said Fran Parent, Lee College director for the federal Perkins Grant. “Because of our expertise and strong partnerships with local industry, Lee College is the best choice for people who want to be successful in vocational careers. These scholarships will make it possible for even more students to take advantage of what we have to offer and help them build a solid future in their chosen vocational field.”

This is the sixth consecutive year Lee College has received funding through the scholarship program aimed at supporting non-traditional students in their pursuit of credit and non-credit training.

The other Houston-area colleges to received funding from the Vocational Scholarship Program include Houston Community College, Lamar Institute of Technology, Lone Star College, San Jacinto College, Texas State Technical College and Wharton County Junior College.

Current Lee College students can apply for the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo scholarship to cover tuition, fees and books. The deadline to apply for the scholarship is Wednesday, Sept. 30. Apply online at https://www.lee.edu/foundation/scholarships-for-students/index.php

Scholarship requirements:

  • Must be enrolled in Fall 2020 semester at Lee College
  • 2.0 GPA or higher
  • Complete online application
  • Must be a U.S. Citizen
  • Must be a Texas resident
  • Must have a declared major in Process Technology, Instrumentation Technology or Electrical technology.

If you have additional questions, email scholarships@lee.edu.

Lee College offers more than 100 associate degree and certificate programs, as well as non-credit workforce and community education courses, that prepare its diverse student body for advanced higher education; successful entry into the workforce; and a variety of in-demand careers. With the main campus and McNair Center located in Baytown, Texas, and a satellite education center in nearby South Liberty County, the college serves a geographic area of more than 220,000 residents that includes 14 independent school districts. To learn more, visit www.lee.edu.